Courses

Foreign Languages & Literatures - Courses
Visit the Course Catalog for the official course description and listing

FLL 380, 381: Foreign Language Teaching Internship

This internship gives well-qualified students the opportunity to gain foreign language teaching experience under faculty supervision in local elementary, middle, and high schools. Internships in French, German, Korean, Russian, and Spanish are available. Students meet on a weekly basis to discuss teaching methodology, language pedagogy, and second-language acquisition theory.
Prerequisite: 211 or higher or permission of the instructor

CHN 101: Elementary Chinese I

The course aims to develop fundamental listening, speaking, reading, and writing abilities in Mandarin Chinese. Students examine approximately 250 new words and more than 30 grammar patterns. Mastery of Pinyin pronunciation is an essential part, and students are trained with computer-based exercises, especially character typing. Class activities may also include practicing calligraphy, singing songs in Chinese, making dumplings, and watching film shows to enhance students’ understanding of Chinese language and culture.

CHN 102: Elementary Chinese II

This course will help students continue to develop fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese, based on 101 class training or equivalents. Students will learn 200 new words and more than 30 new grammar patterns. Mastery of Pinyin pronunciation is still an essential part, and students are to be trained with more frequent computer-based exercises. Class activities also include a calligraphy competition and a Chinese movie show to enhance students’ understanding of Chinese culture.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101 or equivalent proficiency

CHN 111, 112: Intermediate Chinese I and II

This course is a review and expansion of basic grammar and vocabulary and continued development of familiarity with Chinese characters. A lot of attention is given to developing reading and conversational skills and a deeper understanding of the diverse cultures of the Chinese people.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101, 102 or equivalent proficiency

CHN 211: Advanced Chinese Conversation and Composition

This course is designed for students who have completed four semesters of Chinese study or demonstrate equivalent language proficiency. The course emphasizes vocabulary building, advanced reading comprehension, and an increased degree of conversational fluency. Short expository essays on various contemporary social topics are composed in class to help students understand the changing China of today.
Prerequisite: Chinese 112 or equivalent proficiency

CHN 231: Chinese Civilization

This course presents the fundamental features and highlights of Chinese civilization from the Neolithic age down to the twentieth century. It explores the origin, transformation, and continuity of this long-standing culture, discussing varied aspects in philosophy, religion, political institutions, literature, and arts. Students also explore certain areas of Chinese culture that are becoming transnational interests, such as Buddhist practice, geomancy, and medical tradition. No prior knowledge of China or Chinese language is required. All works are read in English translations.

CHN 290, 291: Independent Study

These courses are intended to expand the student’s basic capabilities in the four linguistic skills–listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Enrichment of written grammar review with emphasis on the expansion of vocabulary and stylistics is emphasized. Examination of cultural and contemporary issues through use of texts, films, television, music, and the Internet.
Prerequisites: Chinese 112 or equivalent proficiency

CL 101, 102: Survey of European Literature I and II

Study of the most significant figures and their works in European literary history, exclusive of English. The course aims to acquaint students with the classics in the literatures of Greece, Rome, Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Russia, and other countries in English translation. No knowledge of foreign languages required. Open to all students. Lecture. [W]

CL 121: greek literature in english

A study of the Greek perfection of diverse genres of literature through close reading (usually of entire works) in Epic, Lyric, Tragedy, Old Comedy, History, and Philosophical Dialogue. The relationship of literature to historical and cultural forces, particularly in the fifth century polis of Athens, is explored. The notion of a “classic” in literature. Open to all students.

CL 142: Masterworks of German Literature and Film

In this course, important themes, styles, and cultural issues are examined within the context of German literature and film. Selected readings cover the major periods of literary history, and the film versions of these texts represent all stages of film history, with works from the 1920s and 1930s to the present. Since all readings are available in translation and all films have English subtitles, knowledge of German is not required.

CL 161, 162: Russian Literature in English I and II

A study—through the best available translations—of the whole course of Russian literature, with principal emphasis on the nineteenth-century writers: Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. Open to all students. [W]

CL 225: Special Topics in Comparative Literature

This course introduces the methodology of comparative literature and the problems of translation to advanced literature students. Students should have completed at least two courses in literature given by Foreign Languages and Literatures or the English department. A reading knowledge of one foreign language is strongly recommended.

CL 301: French Cinema in English

French cinematographers and their works have often stood in contrast to large-scale, epic Hollywood productions. This is not to say that the two traditions are totally distinct: cross-fertilization has occurred in both directions. The French have produced a number of cinematographic masterpieces, and many of their most successful films have been recast for an American audience. In this course, we will examine five distinct genres: 1) the French New Wave with films by Truffaut (The Last Metro), Rohmer (Claire’s Knee), Godard (Breathless), and Lelouch (A Man and a Woman); 2) the French Film Noir, with films by Chabrol (The Butcher), Clouzot (Les Diaboliques), and Malle (Elevator to the Gallows); the Historical Epic, with films by Rappeneau (Cyrano), Chereau (Queen Margot), Vigne (The Return of Martin Guerre); Comedies, with films by Veber (The Dinner Game), Serreau (Three Men and a Baby), and Jeunet (Amelie); and Political Films with films by Renoir (La Grande Illusion), Malle (Au Revoir les Enfants), and Resnais (Hiroshima Mon Amour).

CL 351: Special Topics in Literature in Translation

Study of a genre or special topic in foreign literatures in translation. Seminar content is broad in scope and may span several centuries. In addition to the literature, theoretical readings are discussed, and a final research paper is required.
Prerequisite: At least two literature courses in English or a foreign language

CL 460: Reading and Research in Comparative Literature

This course is designed to give advanced students the opportunity to investigate intensively an area of special interest. Students are required to meet with the instructor periodically throughout the semester and to submit a scholarly paper, as well as to take an oral examination at the conclusion of the course.
Prerequisite: Two literature courses in Foreign Languages and Literatures or English

CLSS 103: CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY

Definitions, sources, and interpretations of myth as a cognitive system in ancient and modern culture. This is a survey of major divinities, mortals, myths, hero-legends, and cycles of saga, chiefly Greek, and their function in Greco-Roman civilization, their enduring power in Western culture, and their influence upon Western intellectual and artistic achievement. Open to all students.

CLSS 121: GREEK LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

A study of the Greek perfection of diverse genres of literature through close reading (usually of entire works) in Epic, Lyric, Tragedy, Old Comedy, History, and Philosophical Dialogue. Relationship of literature to historical and cultural forces, particularly in the fifth-century polis of Athens. The notion of a “classic” in literature. Open to all students.

CLSS 220: GREEK TRAGEDY AND BEYOND: FROM AESCHYLUS TO WOODY ALLEN

European theater arrives with a bang: with Greek tragedy, one of the most powerful, complex, and influential literary forms of all times. The objectives of this course are: (1) to introduce the Athenian institutional framework that made Greek tragedy possible; (2) to thoroughly familiarize students with representative works of the three eminent Athenian playwrights, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; (3) to trace how Greek tragedy has inspired later dramatists and filmmakers in their work; and (4) to enhance “deep learning” by providing the opportunity to stage and direct select scenes from Greek tragedy.

FREN 101, 102: Elementary French I and II

Provides students with the four basic language skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Emphasis is on learning the fundamentals of grammar and on the development of verbal skills through their active use. Students having had two or more years of high school French are ineligible to take French 101 unless they obtain the instructor’s permission. Class/laboratory.

FREN 111, 112: Intermediate French I and II

This is a review and expansion of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language. Attention is given to developing reading and conversational skills and a deeper understanding of the culture of France and other francophone countries. Class/laboratory.

FREN 211: Advanced French

Grammar review with emphasis on areas of greatest difficulty. Enrichment of written expression with emphasis on style and vocabulary building. Examination of cultural and contemporary issues through use of the language laboratory (films, television broadcasts, newspaper articles, computerized programs) and discussion of cultural and literary texts. Class/laboratory.

FREN 212: Bridging the Gap: Language to Literature

This course is designed to help students make the difficult transition between advanced language study and the study of French literature. French 211 (Advanced Composition) focuses on developing writing skills necessary for written essays, while this course is designed to prepare students more adequately for reading, interpreting, and discussing literary texts. Activities will focus on close reading of short literary texts or excerpts, class discussion of the material read, and the writing of short literary analyses.
Prerequisite: French 211 or equivalent proficiency

FREN 225: Business French

Designed for the advanced student wishing to acquire specialized knowledge of the French language for use in business. The course examines a variety of topics such as agriculture, industry, postal services, telecommunications, international trade, customs regulations, banking activities, the stock market, major enterprises, advertising, the insurance industry, the real estate market, job offers and applications, résumé writing, and business correspondence.
Prerequisite: French 211 or equivalent proficiency

FREN 321: High and Popular Culture in Medieval and Renaissance France

Introduction to the study of medieval and Renaissance French literature and civilization. Readings from such works as La Chanson de Roland, Yvain ou le chevalier au lion, Tristan et Iseult, Aucassin et Nicolette, Rabelais’s Gargantua et Pantagruel, the poetry of the Pléiade, and Montaigne’s Essais.

FREN 322: Reason, Wit, and Wild Imaginings: Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century French Literature and Civilization

Readings from such works as Corneille’s Le Cid, Racine’s Phèdre, Molière’s Le Tartuffe, Mme de La Fayette’s La Princesse de Clèves, Prévost’s Manon Lescaut, Marivaux’s Le Jeu de l’amour et du hasard, Voltaire’s Candide, and Montesquieu’s Lettres persanes.

FREN 323: Iconoclasts: Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century French Literature

Introduction to the study of such modern literary movements as romanticism, realism, naturalism, symbolism, surrealism, existentialism, and the absurd. Emphasis on poetry, fiction, drama, and criticism in the works of such authors as Mme de Staël, Chateaubriand, Lamartine, Hugo, Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, Zola, Maupassant, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Mallarmé, Jarry, Valéry, Apollinaire, Gide, Proust, Breton, Malraux, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, and Ionesco.

FREN 324: Turning the World Upside Down: French Civilization since 1789

French history, civilization, and culture from the Revolution of 1789 through modern times. Emphasis on major historical figures and events, the evolution of political and social institutions, economic trends, the development of religious, philosophical, and political beliefs, and changes in the modes of artistic expression.

FREN 421: The Sword, the Rose, and the Pen: Constructing Identity in French Medieval and Renaissance Literature and Culture

This course examines themes and techniques of imitation and/or subversion of classical and Biblical sources as strategies for defining the self and the creative process in the vernacular. Readings include such genres as the epic, courtly romance, popular theater, allegorical and lyric poetry, short story, and the essay: La Chanson de Roland, Chrétien de Troyes, Le Roman de la Rose, La Farce de Maistre Pathelin, François Villon, François Rabelais, Joachim du Bellay, Pierre de Ronsard, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, Michel de Montaigne. [W]

FREN 422: The Age of Absolutism

A study of representative classical authors of the seventeenth century and their works, with emphasis on Corneille, Molière, Mme de La Fayette, Pascal, Descartes, La Fontaine, La Rochefoucauld, Malherbe, Théophile, and Racine. [W]

FREN 423: The Artist as Outsider: French Literature of the Nineteenth Century

Study of the development of romanticism, realism, naturalism, and symbolism, with emphasis on such writers as Chateaubriand, Constant, Musset, Sand, Nerval, Hugo, Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, Zola, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarmé, and Villiers de l’Isle-Adam. Attention also may be given to the Parnassian school. [W]

FREN 424: Literature, Ideas, and Film: Twentieth-Century French Culture

The major movements following symbolism are studied in historical context and in the works of such authors as Gide, Proust, Apollinaire, Breton, Mauriac, Colette, Malraux, Sartre, Camus, Ionesco, Robbe-Grillet, Queneau, Perec, Barthes, Kristeva, Ernaux, and Derrida. Topics such as surrealism, Orientalism, ludics, feminism, memory of World War II, the Algerian War, multiculturalism, and Francophonie. [W]

FREN 431: Contemporary France: Political, Economic, and Social Institutions

A study of French civilization since World War II; institutional changes under the fourth and fifth Republics; the educational system; the economy; the media; and cultural life. It examines France in the contemporary world and francophone countries.

FREN 441: Junior/Senior Seminar

Study of a genre or major theme in French literature. Course content is broad in scope. [W]

FREN 460: Reading and Research in French

This course gives students the opportunity to investigate intensively an area of special interest. Students work on their projects independently under the guidance of an instructor. At the end of the semester, students submit a research paper and/or make a substantial oral presentation. Hours arranged.
Prerequisite: Permission of the research instructor

FREN 495, 496: Thesis in French

Tutorial sessions related to the student’s investigation of the area chosen for the honors essay. Open to majors in French who are candidates for departmental honors.
Prerequisite: Permission of the research instructor

GERM 101, 102: Elementary German I and II

Fundamentals of spoken and written language. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. An introduction to the culture of Germany and German-speaking countries. Class/laboratory.

GERM 111, 112: Intermediate German I and II

Review of fundamental principles of grammar and syntax and expansion of vocabulary with short literary and cultural readings. Attention to improving reading, sharpening conversational skills, and developing a deeper understanding of the culture of Germany and other German-speaking countries. Class/laboratory.

GERM 211: Advanced German

This course is designed for students who already have a firm grasp of German language skills (e.g., based on at least four years of high school instruction). The course, with its comprehensive review of basic principles of grammar and syntax, is highly recommended for students planning to study abroad. Increasing emphasis is on idioms and correct conversational usage. Readings of literary and cultural texts, and oral presentations.

GERM 225: Business German

This course is designed for students who already have a firm grasp of German language skills (e.g., based on at least four years of high school instruction). Focus on business culture, terminology, vocabulary, and information about Germany today and other German-speaking countries and their place in both the European and the world markets. Readings of business-related texts and oral presentations.

GERM 311: Contemporary Society in German-Speaking Countries as Reflected in the Media

This course studies texts from newspapers, magazines, and the Internet, and critically views newsreels and video documentaries. Focus on contemporary issues and sociopolitical developments in Germany and German-speaking countries. Emphasis on everyday conversational and idiomatic German.

GERM 312: German Texts and Contexts: Bridging the Gap from Language to Literature

This course critically examines diverse readings in German poetry, prose, and drama of the previous two centuries with a focus on critical analysis of contextual meaning and the structure of literary texts. Introduction to literary terminology and techniques of interpretation. Literature as a reflection of Zeitgeist (social taste or the characteristic spirit of the times) that gave form to the cultural outlook of an epoch or generation.

GERM 321: A Journey through German Cultural History: Texts and Contexts before 1750

This course chronologically traces the development of forms of artistic expression in German literature, respectively within each new historical, cultural, and sociopolitical framework. Representative readings from the beginnings of German literary writings in the seventh century through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque, to the Age of Enlightenment. Discussion of intellectual and philosophical movements.

GERM 322: Age of “-Isms”: Literature and Culture in the German-Speaking World after 1750

This course chronologically traces the development of forms of artistic expression in German literature, respectively within each new historical, cultural, and sociopolitical framework. Representative readings from the Classical Era of the late eighteenth century to the present. Emphasis on characteristics and trends of major literary movements. Introduction to notable nodes of artistic expression such as Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Impressionism, Expressionism, and Modernism.

GERM 423: Liberalism’s Struggle against Repression and Resignation: German Literature and Culture of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century

Highlights characteristics of social perceptions as reflected in literary movements. Analysis and interpretation of literature as a medium for critiquing historical and social developments. Literary responses to political absolutism through the growth of liberalism and nationalism. Social forces reflected in literature from the age of enlightenment through storm and stress, classicism, romanticism, realism, and naturalism. [W] Prerequisite: Completion of at least one 300-level course

GERM 424: From Modernism to Postmodernism and Beyond: Literature and Film of the German-Speaking World in the Twentieth Century

This course provides a comprehensive overview of poetry, prose, and drama of the twentieth century. Focus is on matters of literary style, as well as major social, political, and cultural movements that influenced and shaped literary and artistic expression from the turn of the century to the present. [W]
Prerequisite: Completion of at least one 300-level course

GERM 431: Literature and Film as a Mirror of Socio-Historical Issues in the Contemporary German-Speaking World

This course analyzes literature after 1945, first and foremost the short story as a reflection of the forces of social change in Germany and other German-speaking countries. Emphasis is on the relationship of artistic expression and history, social issues, political conviction, and personal experience. Focus is on techniques for interpretation of literature. [W]
Prerequisite: Completion of at least one 300-level course

GERM 441: Junior/Senior Seminar

Investigation of a movement, a prominent author, intellectual topic, study of a genre, literary masterpiece, or significant theme in German literature. [W]
Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least one 300-level course

GERM 460: Reading and Research in German

This course provides qualified students with the opportunity to investigate an area of special interest. Students work on their projects independently under the guidance of their mentor and submit a research paper and/or a substantial oral presentation. Hours arranged.
Prerequisite: Permission of the research instructor

GERM 495, 496: Thesis in German

Tutorial sessions related to an investigation of the specific area chosen by the student for an honors essay. Hours arranged. Permission of the research instructor.
Prerequisite: Open to majors who are candidates for departmental honors

GRK 101, 102: ELEMENTARY GREEK I AND II

Emphasis on achieving skills necessary for sustained reading of Attic Greek texts. Inductive system of continuous reading complemented by deductive study and exercises in grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and composition. Recitation.

GRK 111, 112: INTERMEDIATE GREEK I AND II

A close reading of at least one major dialogue of Plato with attention to the intellectual, moral, and cultural climate of classical Greece. Spring: A close reading of at least one tragedy of Sophocles or of Euripides with attention to its dramatic art and intellectual and moral content. Recitation.

HEBR 101, 102: Elementary Hebrew I and II

Fundamentals of the spoken and written modern language. Development of listening and speaking skills and of facility in reading and writing standard, un-vowelled texts. Introduction to the culture of Israel. Class/laboratory.

HEBR 111, 112: Intermediate Hebrew I and II

Review and expansion of the basic grammar, vocabulary, and idioms. Development of skills of self-expression and conversation. Readings in short stories and in newspaper and magazine articles, and monitoring of television broadcasts in the language laboratory to gain a deeper understanding of Israeli culture.

HEBR 290, 291: Independent Study in Hebrew

These courses are intended to expand the student’s basic capabilities in the four linguistic skills-listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Enrichment of written grammar review with emphasis on the expansion of vocabulary and stylistics. Examination of cultural and contemporary issues through use of texts, films, television, music, and the Internet.
Prerequisite: Hebrew 112 or equivalent proficiency

JAPN 101, 102: Elementary Japanese I and II

Fundamentals of spoken and written Japanese. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. An introduction to the culture of Japan. Class/laboratory.

JAPN 111, 112: Intermediate Japanese I and II

Review and expansion of basic grammar and vocabulary. Short literary and cultural readings. Attention to developing reading and conversational skills and a deeper understanding of the culture of Japan. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101, 102 or equivalent proficiency

JAPN 290, 291: Independent Study in Japanese

This course emphasizes reading authentic materials and writing compositions and correspondence.
Prerequisite: Japanese 112 , equivalent proficiency or permission of instructor

LAT 101, 102: ELEMENTARY LATIN I AND II

Emphasis on achieving skills necessary for sustained reading of classical Latin texts. Fundamentals and exercises in grammar, syntax, and development of vocabulary. Some work on Latin roots for vocabulary-building in English and enhancement of knowledge of European languages. Recitation.

LAT 111, 112: INTERMEDIATE LATIN I AND II

Reading of short selections in prose and in the poetry of Catullus with attention to the political, moral, and cultural climate of the late Roman Republic. Spring: Reading of at least one book of Tusculan Disputations of Cicero and of selections from the Satyricon of Petronius against the background of the early Roman Empire. Recitation.

LAT 211: ADVANCED LATIN

Courses such as: Latin Lyric Poetry, Latin Elegy, Latin Prose of the Early Empire, Latin Satire, Medieval Latin, Latin Philosophy, Lucretius, and Cicero.

RUSS 101, 102: Elementary Russian I and II

Fundamentals of the spoken and written language. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. An introduction to the culture of Russia. Class/laboratory.

RUSS 111, 112: Intermediate Russian I and II

Review and expansion of basic grammar and vocabulary. Short literary and cultural readings. Attention to developing reading, writing, and conversational skills and a deeper understanding of Russian culture. Class/laboratory.

RUSS 209, 210: Survey of Russian Literature I and II

A chronological study of the major literary movements and styles from the seventeenth century to the present in prose, poetry, and drama. Special attention is given to the ideological and historical background.
Prerequisite: Russian 112 or equivalent proficiency

RUSS 211: Advanced Russian

A course in advanced grammar and syntax designed to develop a high degree of aural comprehension and conversational fluency. Perceptive reading and clear writing are stressed. Discussion of the major social, ideological, and artistic trends and movements of Russia.

RUSS 290, 291: Independent Study in Russian

This course emphasizes reading authentic materials and writing compositions and correspondence.
Prerequisite: Russian 112, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

RUSS 311: Russian Short Story

A study of the Russian novella and short story with emphasis on nineteenth and twentieth century fiction. Reading and interpretation of works by writers such as Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Gorky, Babel, Olesha, Solzhenitsyn, and others.
Prerequisite: Russian 112 or equivalent proficiency

RUSS 316: Soviet Russian Literature

A study of developments from 1917 to the present for their literary, social and political significance. Reading and interpretation of works by writers such as Mayakovsky, Gladkov, Fadeyev, Katayev, Simonov, Panova, Evtushenko, Trifonov, and others.
Prerequisite: Russian 112 or equivalent proficiency

SPAN 101, 102: Elementary Spanish I and II

This sequence is for beginners, covering the fundamentals of spoken and written language through the development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Class/laboratory. Students with two or more years of high school Spanish are ineligible to take Spanish 101. These students are encouraged to enroll either in Spanish 111 or, if they find the intermediate sequence too challenging, in Spanish 103.
Prerequisite: Novices only

SPAN 103: Accelerated Elementary Spanish

An intensive program for high beginners. The course takes a communicative approach toward the development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Ideal for students in need of review, and those with professional, family, or travel interests. Class/Laboratory. Not open to students with credit for Spanish 101-102. Students with two or more years of high school Spanish should submit their AP, IB or SAT II score to the Registrar or take the placement test administered by the Department. First-year students should take the online placement test prior to registration. Continuing students should make an appointment with the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department Head to take the exam prior to registration.

SPAN 111, 112: Intermediate Spanish I and II

Review and expansion of basic grammar and vocabulary. Short literary and cultural readings. Development of reading, writing, listening, and conversational skills as well as a deeper understanding of Hispanic cultures. Class/laboratory. Students with two or more years of high school Spanish should submit their AP, IB, or SAT II score to the Registrar or take the placement test administered by the Department. First-year students should take the online placement test prior to registration. Continuing students should make an appointment with the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department Head to take the exam prior to registration.

SPAN 211: Advanced Spanish

Advanced Spanish is an intensive composition course that emphasizes the development of critical and analytical skills in Spanish through the study of Spanish and Latin American literature and film. Designed as a bridge between language development and upper-level civilization, literature, and culture courses, this class focuses on process writing and is generally taken after a student has completed the Intermediate sequence of language study. Students with two or more years of high school Spanish should submit their AP, IB, or SAT II score to the Registrar or take the placement test administered by the Department. First-year students should take the online placement test prior to registration. Continuing students should make an appointment with the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department Head to take the exam prior to registration.
Prerequisites: Spanish 112 or equivalent proficiency

SPAN 215: Spanish for Heritage Speakers

Designed to build on the existing skills of students who have grown up in Spanish-speaking environments, this course provides the opportunity to develop communicative competence in Spanish in both formal and informal settings through the expansion of speaking, reading, and writing skills. Objectives include: review of such critical language aspects as spelling conventions, written accents, and the variety of linguistic registers or communicative settings (i.e., informal, formal, academic, etc.). Extensive reading, writing, and communicative activities. Equivalent to Spanish 211. Course does not assume previous formal study of the language. All participating students will take a written skills-assessment test.
Prerequisite: Home background experience in Spanish

SPAN 225: Business Spanish

This course is designed to teach advanced students how to use their language skills within the context of the Spanish-speaking professional world. Students acquire specialized vocabulary and knowledge related to topics such as banking and finance, telecommunications, import/export operations, advertising, and marketing. Course activities include composition of business letters and résumés, summaries, and translation of official documents and business correspondence, exploration and analysis of commerce-related Internet sites, and completion and presentation of a country-specific team project. Class/laboratory. Note: Business Spanish does not count toward the major or minor programs in Spanish. Students with two or more years of high school Spanish should submit their AP, IB, or SAT II score to the registrar or take the placement test administered by the department. First-year students should take the online placement test prior to registration. Continuing students should make an appointment with the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department Head to take the exam prior to registration.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent proficiency

SPAN 303: Spanish Civilization and Culture

An interdisciplinary exploration of the Iberian Peninsula’s civilizations and cultures as reflected in its history, literature, peoples, politics, and arts. Topics range from Spanish Unification in 1492 through the rise and fall of Spain as an imperial power. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 304: Spanish American Civilization and Culture, 1492-1900

An interdisciplinary exploration of civilizations and cultures from the colonial period through the early twentieth century as reflected in its history, literature, peoples, politics, and arts. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 310: Survey of Spanish Literature I

An introduction to the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages through the 17th century, from the story of the Cid through the myth of Don Juan. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 311: Survey of Spanish Literature II

An introduction to the literature of Spain from the eighteenth century to the present, from the Enlightenment through the post-civil war era. The course examines how authors such as Larra, Castro, Pardo Bazán, Galdós, and Machado responded to the challenges posed by the shifting realities of their times. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 313: Contemporary Spain

An interdisciplinary study that examines the evolution of Spanish society from the nineteenth to the twentieth century. Topics include Spain’s problematic transition from feudalism to modernity, the rise of regionalism and its impact on national identity, and literary creativity and censorship in a nation vaulting between reactionary and democratic political forces.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 314: Contemporary Spanish America and Hispanics in the U.S.

An interdisciplinary study of current cultural and political trends in Spanish America with emphasis on national and continental identities, political responses to development, the vitality of popular culture and the arts, and the growing importance of Hispanics in the United States. Laboratory assignments.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 317: Survey of Spanish American Literature I

An introduction to the literature of Spanish America, from the sixteenth to the early twentieth century, emphasizing the literary response to the peoples and places of the New World, the transformation of Spain’s literary legacy, the rise of national traditions after independence, and the modernistas’ answer to regionalism. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 318: Survey of Spanish American Literature II

An introduction to the literature of Spanish America, from the early twentieth century to the present day. Among the issues addressed are the literature of social protest and reform, artistic experimentation in contemporary poetry and narrative fiction, and the rise of the novel in the second half of the twentieth century. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 370: Seminar in Translation

The course’s aim is to introduce students to theoretical issues and the practical applications of translation. We will combine theory and practice to examine the full complexity of translation as both an art and a science. Specifically, we will work with the particular features of the translation process from English to Spanish and Spanish to English through a semester-long translation practicum.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Spanish or permission of the instructor

SPAN 421: Seminar in the Literature and Culture of the New World

An in-depth study of the influence of colonial literature in both the formation of a Latin American identity and the development of contemporary writing. Texts by the explorers, missionaries, and conquistadores in the New World (including Columbus, Friar Bartolomé de las Casas, Hernán Cortés), and the subsequent generations of “American-born” writers (such as “The Inca” Garcilaso de la Vega). May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Class/laboratory. [W]
Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or 317, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 423: Seminar in Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture

An in-depth study of a literary theme, author, or genre related to Spain during the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Emphasizing the cultural contexts, examples of topics include transvestite comedy, the short prose of Cervantes, the Spanish Inquisition, or Neo-Baroque themes and imagery in contemporary film and literature. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Class/laboratory. [W]
Prerequisite: Spanish 303 or 310, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 425: Don Quixote

Cervantes’ masterpiece as it relates to today’s reader, its impact on contemporary culture, and the stylistic innovations that make this novel a modern classic. Required of all majors in Spanish. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: One survey course in Hispanic literature, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 427: Seminar in Contemporary Spanish Literature and Culture

An in-depth study of a literary theme, genre, author, or cultural movement in Spain from the late nineteenth century to the present. Examples include postwar novel, film studies, and Spanish surrealism. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Class/laboratory. [W]
Prerequisite: Spanish 303, 311 or 313, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor

SPAN 428: Seminar in Modern Spanish American Literature and Culture

An in-depth study of a literary theme, genre, author, or movement in the cultural context of Spanish America during the late nineteenth century through the present day. Topics include short story and the fantastic, fictions of history in contemporary novel, and from popular culture to narrative fiction. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Class/laboratory. [W]
Prerequisite: Spanish 304, 314, or 318, equivalent proficiency or permission of the instructor

SPAN 435: Research Seminar in Hispanic Literature and Civilization

Development of research skills and methodologies as applied to a specific topic in Hispanic studies: a literary theme, genre, author, or movement, and/or a cultural, historical, or political trend in Spain or Spanish America. Required of all majors in Spanish during their senior year. Only open to non-majors with permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Class/multimedia research. [W]

SPAN 460: Reading and Research in Spanish

Individual research under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors. Hours arranged.
Prerequisite: Two 300-level literature or culture courses, and permission of the faculty mentor

SPAN 495, 496: Thesis in Spanish

Open only to majors in Spanish who are candidates for departmental honors. Tutorial sessions related to the student’s research and essay project. Hours arranged.
Prerequisite: Permission of the research instructor

Contact Us

Sidney Donnell, Department Head
404 Pardee Hall
(610) 330-5260
donnells@lafayette.edu

Markus Dubischar, Assistant Head
423 Pardee Hall
(610) 330-5293
dubischm@lafayette.edu

Joli Mellett, Department Secretary
410 Pardee Hall
(610) 330-5252
mellettj@lafayette.edu

Foreign Languages and Literatures
Lafayette College
413 Pardee Hall
Easton, PA 18042
(610) 330-5252
(610) 330-5656 (fax)