FREN - French

FREN 101 - Elementary French I

Provides students with the four basic language skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Emphasis is on learning the fundamentals of grammar and on the development of verbal skills through their active use. Students having had two or more years of high school French are ineligible to take FREN 101 unless they obtain the instructor's permission. Class/laboratory. Language level and subsequent course placement will be determined by the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department.

FREN 102 - Elementary French II

Provides students with the four basic language skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Emphasis is on learning the fundamentals of grammar and on the development of verbal skills through their active use. Students having had two or more years of high school French are ineligible to take French 101 unless they obtain the instructor's permission. Class/laboratory. Language level and subsequent course placement will be determined by the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department. [H]

Prerequisite
FREN 101 or equivalent proficiency

FREN 103 - Accelerated Elementary French

Accelerated Elementary French is an intensive program for high beginners. This course takes a communicative approach to developing reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills, while providing a diverse array of on-line ancillary materials to enhance the student's understanding of French and Francophone cultures. Students wishing to take this course should consult with the instructor in order to determine whether it is appropriate for them. In addition to four hours of class instruction per week, students will be expected to actively engage in self-directed learning, both on-line and in the Language Resource Center. [H]

FREN 111 - Intermediate French I

Review and expansion of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language. Attention to developing reading and conversational skills and a deeper understanding of the culture of France and other francophone countries. Class/laboratory. Language level and subsequent course placement will be determined by the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department. [H]

Prerequisite
FREN 102 or 103 or equivalent proficiency

FREN 112 - Intermediate French II

Review and expansion of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language. Attention to developing reading and conversational skills and a deeper understanding of the culture of France and other francophone countries. Class/laboratory. Language level and subsequent course placement will be determined by the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department. [GM2, H]

Prerequisite
FREN 111 or equivalent proficiency

FREN 211 - Advanced French

Grammar review with emphasis on areas of greatest difficulty. Enrichment of written expression with emphasis on style and vocabulary building. Examination of cultural and contemporary issues through use of the language laboratory (films, television broadcasts, newspaper articles, computerized programs) and discussion of cultural and literary texts. Class/laboratory. Language level and subsequent course placement will be determined by the Foreign Languages & Literatures Department. [H]

Prerequisite
FREN 112 or equivalent proficiency

FREN 212 - Bridging the Gap: Language to Literature

This course is designed to help students make the difficult transition between advanced language study and the study of French literature. FREN 211 (Advanced Composition) focuses on developing writing skills necessary for written essays, while this course is designed to prepare students more adequately for reading, interpreting, and discussing literary texts. Activities will focus on close reading of short literary texts or excerpts, class discussion of the material read, and the writing of short literary analyses. [H]

Prerequisite
FREN 211 or equivalent proficiency

FREN 225 - Business French

Designed for the advanced student wishing to acquire specialized knowledge of the French language for use in business. The course examines a variety of topics such as agriculture, industry, postal services, telecommunications, international trade, customs regulations, banking activities, the stock market, major enterprises, advertising, the insurance industry, the real estate market, job offers and applications, résumé writing, and business correspondence.

Prerequisite
FREN 211 or equivalent proficiency

FREN 321 - High and Popular Culture in Medieval and Renaissance France

Introduction to the study of medieval and Renaissance French literature and civilization. Readings from such works as La Chanson de Roland, Yvain ou le chevalier au lion, Tristan et Iseult, Aucassin et Nicolette, Rabelais's Gargantua et Pantagruel, the poetry of the Pléiade, and Montaigne's Essais. [H]

FREN 322 - Reason, Wit, and Wild Imaginings: Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century French Literature and Civilization

Readings from such works as Corneille's Le Cid, Racine's Phèdre, Molière's Le Tartuffe, Mme de La Fayette's La Princesse de Clèves, Prévost's Manon Lescaut, Marivaux's Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard, Voltaire's Candide, and Montesquieu's Lettres persanes. [H]

FREN 323 - Iconoclasts: Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century French Literature

Introduction to the study of such modern literary movements as romanticism, realism, naturalism, symbolism, surrealism, existentialism, and the absurd. Emphasis on poetry, fiction, drama, and criticism in the works of such authors as Mme de Staël, Chateaubriand, Lamartine, Hugo, Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, Zola, Maupassant, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Mallarmé, Jarry, Valéry, Apollinaire, Gide, Proust, Breton, Malraux, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, and Ionesco. [H]

FREN 324 - Turning the World Upside Down: French Civilization since 1789

French history, civilization, and culture from the Revolution of 1789 through modern times. Emphasis on major historical figures and events, the evolution of political and social institutions, economic trends, the development of religious, philosophical, and political beliefs, and changes in the modes of artistic expression. [H]

FREN 325 - Education and Empire: Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Francophone Literature and Film

An introduction to Global Francophone and Postcolonial literature and film through the lens of the classroom. Students will examine the history of French Republican schools, as well as the role of education in France's ''mission civilisatrice,'' (or mission to ''civilize''). Readings and films will introduce students to major Francophone authors and directors including Aimé Césaire, Frantz Fanon, Ferdinand Oyono, Euzhan Palcy, and Mariama Bâ. [GM2] 
Prerequisite
FREN 211

FREN 421 - The Sword, the Rose, and the Pen: Constructing Identity in French Medieval and Renaissance Literature and Culture

This course examines themes and techniques of imitation and/or subversion of classical and Biblical sources as strategies for defining the self and the creative process in the vernacular. Readings include such genres as the epic, courtly romance, popular theater, allegorical and lyric poetry, short story, and the essay (La Chanson de Roland, Chrétien de Troyes, Le Roman de la Rose, La Farce de Maistre Pathelin, François Villon, François Rabelais, Joachim du Bellay, Pierre de Ronsard, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, Michel de Montaigne). [H, W]

FREN 423 - The Artist as Outsider: French Literature of the Nineteenth Century

Study of the development of romanticism, realism, naturalism, and symbolism, with emphasis on such writers as Chateaubriand, Constant, Musset, Sand, Nerval, Hugo, Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, Zola, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarmé, and Villiers de l'Isle-Adam. Attention also may be given to the Parnassian school. [H, W]

FREN 424 - Literature, Ideas, and Film: Twentieth-Century French Culture

The major movements following symbolism are studied in historical context and in the works of such authors as Gide, Proust, Apollinaire, Breton, Mauriac, Colette, Malraux, Sartre, Camus, Ionesco, Robbe-Grillet, Queneau, Perec, Barthes, Kristeva, Ernaux, and Derrida. Topics such as surrealism, Orientalism, ludics, feminism, memory of World War II, the Algerian War, multiculturalism, and Francophonie. [H, W]

FREN 425 - French Cinema

French cinematographers and their works have often stood in contrast to large-scale epic Hollywood productions. This is not to say that the two traditions are totally distinct: cross-fertilization has occurred in both directions. This course will examine several eras of French film-making: the Golden Age, the Cinema de Qualite, and the Nouvelle Vague, as well as various genres, such as the the Film Noir, the Cinema du patrimoine, the Cinema de look, the Cinema de banlieue, and Feminist film making. [H, W]

Prerequisite
At least one 300-level French course

FREN 441 - Junior/Senior Seminar

Study of a genre or major theme in French literature. Course content is broad in scope. [H, W]

FREN 460 - Reading and Research in French

This course gives students the opportunity to investigate intensively an area of special interest. Students work on their projects independently under the guidance of an instructor. At the end of the semester, students submit a research paper and/or make a substantial oral presentation. Hours arranged.

Prerequisite
Permission of the research instructor

FREN 495-496 - Thesis in French

Tutorial sessions related to the student's investigation of the area chosen for the honors essay. Open to majors in French who are candidates for departmental honors. [One W credit only upon completion of both 495 and 496]

Prerequisite
Permission of the research instructor